Our Educational Message

Hi, and welcome to our blog. This space is designed to share ideas and methodologies that we use to teach Turkish teenagers. In particular, there is a strong focus on ICT-ELT, which means if you like visual and technological support for your style of teaching, this blog is for you. My colleague, Brentson Ramsey, has been working alongside me for three years. He is also a big proponent of the ICT-ELT Paradigm, which means he will also be posting from his own teaching perspective on the blog.

2010 was the beginning of this new journey, and although there is no definitive ICT-ELT road map available for everyone to follow, it is exciting to explore the technological means to make teaching more fun and affective for students. Our main message is for teachers to ADOPT & ADAPT the paradigm shift for their own needs, and remember that
ICT-ELT is a TOOL, NOT a SOLUTION.

Thursday, 1 September 2011

BLOOMS Taxonomy and its SIGNIFICANCE to us all..

video

A statement of a learning objective contains a verb (an action) and an object (usually a noun).

  • The verb generally refers to [actions associated with] the intended cognitive process.
  • The object generally describes the knowledge students are expected to acquire or construct.
    (Anderson and Krathwohl, 2001, pp. 4–5)
The cognitive process dimension represents a continuum of increasing cognitive complexityfrom remember to create. Anderson and Krathwohl identify 19 specific cognitive processes that further clarify the bounds of the six categories (Table 1).
Table 1. The cognitive processes dimension categories, cognitive processes (and alternative names)
 
remember understand apply analyze evaluate create
recognizing
(identifying)
recalling
(retrieving)
interpreting
(clarifying, paraphrasing, representing, translating)
exemplifying
(illustrating, instantiating)
classifying
(categorizing, subsuming)
summarizing
(abstracting, subsuming)
inferring
(concluding, extrapolating, interpolating, predicting)
comparing
(contrasting, mapping, matching)
explaining
(constructing models)
executing
(carrying out)
implementing
(using)
differentiating
(discriminating, distinguishing, focusing, selecting)
organizing
(finding coherence, integrating, outlining, parsing, structuring)
attributing
(deconstructing)
checking
(coordinating, detecting, monitoring, testing)
critiquing
(judging)
generating
(hypothesizing)
planning
(designing)
producing
(construct)
(Table 1 adapted from Anderson and Krathwohl, 2001, pp. 6768.)

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